Batiked papers

Batiked papers are produced in more or less the same way as batiked textiles. First, the paper is made impermeable for pigments by applying a substance called 'reservage' in a pattern. Then the paper is folded or creased and immersed in a dye bath. The paper is then again flattened and the reservage is rinsed out, revealing the pattern. Sometimes, the similarity to batiked textiles is so great that a book covers in batiked paper are sometimes described as being made of textile. In the decorated paper collection, the batiked papers are an important 'rest group', that is, decorated papers that do not belong to the well-known large groups of marbled, paste, block-printed, brocade and lithographed papers. Some illustrative examples of batike papers are shown here.

Batiked paper (reservage paper), creased, c.1920. [PC SERIE W 34]

Batiked paper (reservage paper), creased, c.1920. [PC SERIE W 34]

Batiked paper (reservage paper), creased, c.1920. [PC SERIE W 35]

Batiked paper (reservage paper), creased, c.1920. [PC SERIE W 35]

Batiked paper (reservage paper), creased, c.1940. [PC SERIE W 36]

Batiked paper (reservage paper), creased, c.1940. [PC SERIE W 36]