Brocade paper

This brocade paper, designed by Paul Reymund, has a leaf-gold printed background with a design of large, fairly robust trails with double-lined stalks and small flowers, and many tiny birds and insects in between. Along the border is a signature in small letters: PAULS REYMUND N 30.

Paul Reymund made his brocade paper in Nuremberg, where he ran a business around 1800, employing six workers. He came from a family of decorated paper makers, of which the paternal line can be traced through Andreas Reymund (gold and silver paper maker) to Johann Michael Reymund (`Golden Papierpräger'), who lived on the Bonesberg in Nuremberg and became well known at the beginning of the eighteenth century as the first Nuremberg brocade paper maker.

A distinctive feature of brocade paper is an embossed structure pressed into the paper by means of real or imitation gold or silver foil. Thick plates or cylinders of copper were used, with the representation in positive or negative relief. In most cases uncoloured paper was used, but sometimes coloured paper or paper with a coloured design was used as the basis for such decorated paper. Later on brocade paper was sometimes coloured by hand. It comes in all variations, from simple patterns to very intricate ones, while often the names and residences of the maker and the designer are found in the margin, together with its serial number. The first brocade papers were made in Augsburg around 1700. They belong to the most valuable and vulnerable decorated papers. These papers are very sensitive and liable to deterioration from humidity and air pollution and require high storage standards, also for the prevention of user-damage.

The paper-historical collection has a large number of brocade papers, including various magnificent applications of such papers as part of bookbindings, for instance as covers of nineteenth-century doctoral theses.

Een volledig blad brokaatpapier; goud op blauwgroen papier. Paul Reymund. Nuremberg, c. 1785. 430 x 355 mm, plate 380 x 315 mm. PC IV.1.

Een volledig blad brokaatpapier; goud op blauwgroen papier. Paul Reymund. Nuremberg, c. 1785. 430 x 355 mm, plate 380 x 315 mm. PC IV.1.

Literature

A. Haemmerle. Buntpapier. Herkommen, Geschichte, Techniken, Beziehungen zur Kunst. München 1977, p. 77-130.