Paste paper

Paste paper is made by applying paste paint in one or more colours to a sheet of paper with a brush or sponge. Directly after the application of the paint, the paper maker adds a decoration with stamps or other tools, sometimes even with his thumb or finger. As long as the paste paint remains wet, all sorts of patterns and designs can be created. This procedure, by which the layer of paste is distorted in places and varieties in colour intensity are created, gives the decoration a characteristic, three-dimensional appearance. Paste papers were often made by bookbinders, paste being an adhesive that is used a great deal in bookbinding. Apart from some historical paste papers, some examples are shown of modern uses of this technique.

Paste paper with pressed-in decoration, late 18th century. [PC SERIE W 19]

Paste paper with pressed-in decoration, late 18th century. [PC SERIE W 19]

Paste paper with pressed-in decoration, late 18th century. [PC SERIE W 20]

Paste paper with pressed-in decoration, late 18th century. [PC SERIE W 20]

Paste paper with pressed-in decoration, late 18th century. [PC SERIE W 21]

Paste paper with pressed-in decoration, late 18th century. [PC SERIE W 21]

Paste paper with pressed-in decoration. Victoria Hall, Norwich, 1994. [PC SERIE W 22]

Paste paper with pressed-in decoration. Victoria Hall, Norwich, 1994. [PC SERIE W 22]

Paste paper with pressed-in decoration. Jolanda Bakker, Amsterdam, 1996. [PC SERIE W 23]

Paste paper with pressed-in decoration. Jolanda Bakker, Amsterdam, 1996. [PC SERIE W 23]

Paste paper with pressed-in decoration. Jolanda Bakker, Amsterdam, 1996. [PC SERIE W 24]

Paste paper with pressed-in decoration. Jolanda Bakker, Amsterdam, 1996. [PC SERIE W 24]